National Geographic

National Geographic

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Life is an adventure - enjoy the ride and the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.
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National Geographic

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Photograph by simonnorfolkstudio Two Years ago the Yemeni crisis took a deadly turn. According to the United Nations, 16,200 people have been killed in Yemen since 2015 including 10,000 civilians. The humanitarian situation in what was already one of the world’s poorest nations, is now, after Syria, the most critical on the planet, with 20% of Yemenis severely food insecure. Here photographed the village of Al Hajjarayn in Wadi Daw'an, the ancestral home of the Bin Laden family. michaelhoppengallery benrubi_gallery galleryluisotti natgeo cityscape photojournalism islamicarchitecture islamic documentaryphotography simonnorfolkstudio simonnorfolk reportage Yemen fightpoverty photojournalism journalism onassignment documentaryphotography UNESCO CivilWar war conflict arabianpeninsular arabia simonnorfolkstudio simonnorfolk worldheritage streetphotography

5 Minutes ago
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Photo by dguttenfelder A farmer in a tractor works a field near the U.S. town of Van Meter, Iowa. I spent the day with gratitude beside my family on my sister's rural Iowa farm.

6 Hours ago
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earthday savetheplanet Photo by edkashi/viiphoto. Alaskan mountains stand near Fairbanks, Alaska on August 2, 2015. In villages around , winter is arriving later than usual and rushing into spring. The rising ocean temperatures are decreasing the offshore ice and slush that have acted as a storm buffer for the villages in the past. Last winter had no offshore ice at all. ns are debating relocation and have the big storms to consider. According to Robert E. Jensen, a research hydraulic engineer at the Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center, storms on ’s west coast can carry the force of a Category 1 hurricane, but the diameter can be up to 10x greater, affecting a larger area and lasting longer. everydayclimatechange ECC actonclimate climatechangeisreal

9 Hours ago
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Photo by argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). Happy EarthDay! There's no Planet B, let's take care of it! A herd of elephants at the watering hole, TuliBlock, Eastern Botswana. Taken from a photo blind about 5 meters way!

11 Hours ago
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Photo by chien_chi_chang The North Korean defector who escaped from China, traveled through Laos and reached Thailand for political asylum, is finally accepted by South Korean government and ready to start a new life in his empty apartment in Seoul with a bag of rice from the Red Cross. The video Escape from North Korea based on the images from natgeo assignment will be screening at Total Museum of Contemporary Art in Seoul starting in April, 2018. EscapefromNorthKorea MagnumPhotos cccontheroad

14 Hours ago
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Video by bertiegregory. A female leopard and her little cub relax in a dried up river bed in the Sabi Sands, South Africa. Leopard cubs are born blind and start to develop sight after 10 days. Cubs will stay then stay with their mothers until they're around 2 years old. Follow bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures! earthday

16 Hours ago
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HAPPY 🌏 EARTH DAY!!! stevewinterphoto natgeo Nature is perfection. It gives us the air we breathe and the water we need for all life. I am working on a natgeo Jaguar story. Here is Scarface running after a caiman which he did not get this time. Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for Asian Traditional Medicine and luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” wildaid bertiegregory My first story with big cats was the 1st natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have-kids hang out and play like these 2 cubs.. Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest. They give us 75% of the fresh water. If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the JAGUAR and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the Tigers and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them. So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves. Please visit CauseAnUproar.org to find out other ways to become involved to save big cats! follow me stevewinterphoto to see more images from my work with natgeo and Thanks!! stevewinterphoto natgeo nglive natgeochannel natgeowild thephotosociety natgeocreative BCI bigcatsintiative startwith1thing projetooncafari refugioecologicocaiman pantheracats pantanalsafaris canonusa redcine africanparksnetwork ldfoundation leonardodicaprio

17 Hours ago
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Video by renan_ozturk // The Earth taking a long polar tidal breath. Shot during the 'Under An Arctic Sky' film premiering tribeca film festival this weekend! happyearthday iceland

18 Hours ago
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Video by ronan_donovan // I can't think of a better way to celebrate Earth Day than to get outside and shake off the winter chill. These male Greater Sage-Grouse are strutting in the new day across the western United Sates hoping to impress the females. Crank the 🔉for the full effect. Check out ronan_donovan for more photos and videos that celebrate the magic of our shared Earth.

19 Hours ago
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Photograph by Paulnicklen taken while on assignment for natgeo // Nature never ceases to amaze, impress and inspire. As a biologist and naturalist I have had a long fascination with the stories that wildlife footprints tell. When I look at these two sets of tracks of polar bears in Svalbard, Norway, I see the zig-zag pattern of a female bear who is in estrus during the spring. She would have been walking during a heavy downfall of snow. She would have compressed that snow with her weight and later, strong winds would have removed the excess snow leaving a set of elevated tracks as if they were cast in plater. Next to her tracks are those of a much larger male bear who would have been sniffing the polar wind in search of a mate. With his powerful nose, he would have caught her scent and followed her in a much more direct and determined nature. I am so excited to be able to share these images as fine art in my gallery in SoHo, New York city. The grand opening is today from noon until 9pm. followme on paulnicklen to get more details. I hope to see you there. fineartwithpurpose nature naturelovers adventure gratitude sea_legacy polarbear snow ice beauty

21 Hours ago
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Photograph by cookjenshel For Earth Day we all need to take action to preserve this incredible planet we live on – it is the only one we can call home. Thirty years ago we made our first trip to Greenland, to begin a project photographing the beauty of that ice-filled country. To our great distress, on every successive trip we witnessed increasing amounts of ice melt. Please take what steps you can, we’re all in this together. natgeogreative thephotosociety natgeo EarthDay ScienceMarch ClimateChange GoGreen Recycle ParisAgreement Nature Greenland

22 Hours ago
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Photo coryrichards // Dorje, a Tibetan yak herder, stands for a portrait at 19,000 ft. on the north side of Everest. For a number of nomadic yak herders in Tibet, the Everest season provides the largest piece of annual income. With hundreds of thousands of lbs of gear and food to be moved up and down the mountain from basecamp to Advanced basecamp, the season is non stop from April thru June. This income can last individuals and families thru the year. It's a taxing livelihood on both man and animal. That said, it's welcome work for the community. Dorje does not have a last name as we recognize them and did not know his age. He simply said thru a knowing smile that he'd been doing this a long time. For more images from our no Os attempt on Everest's north side, follow coryrichards and adrianballinger as well EverestNoFilter on Snapchat. We'll be checking in via FB Live on natgeo channels as well throughout the expedition. Image shot on phone.

23 Hours ago
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Video ladzinski / Happy EarthDay natgeo insta family! Here's 15 seconds of beauty, a starry sky time-lapse over Zimbabwe'a MalilangweReserve ▶️🔊

1 Days ago
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Photo by christian_foto In the Zapotec cultures of Oaxaca, Muxe is an assigned male at birth, who dresses and behaves in ways otherwise associated with the female gender. They are considered the third gender. It is believed that the term Muxe comes from the Spanish word "Mujer", a phonetic derivation that the Zapotecs began to use in the sixteenth century. From pre-Columbian times, the Zapotecs considered the Muxes as a third gender, no better or worse than men and women, simply different. Some Muxes form monogamous couples with men and get married, others live in groups, and others marry women and had children. Within contemporary Zapotec culture, reports vary as to their social status. Muxes in village and communities may not be disparaged and highly respected, while in larger, more westernised towns they may face some discrimination, especially from men, due to homophobic attitudes. Photo by christian_foto / prime_collective muxes oaxaca mexico​

1 Days ago
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Photo by FransLanting The spiny desert of southern Madagascar is a world unto itself. Ninety-five percent of its plants are found nowhere else—not even elsewhere in Madagascar. A waxy coating on its leaves helps this aloe minimize moisture loss. I kneeled down to silhouette it against a sunset sky reddened by dust from a volcanic eruption in the Philippines, 5,000 miles away. To learn more about the creative techniques I use to photograph plants, follow meFransLanting. thephotosociety natgeotravel natgeocreative CreativeLive Madagascar NaturePhotography Beauty Nature Creativity

1 Days ago
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Photo by CristinaMittermeier // This skua was such a wonderful mother, she almost made me cry with emotion. When I accidentally got too close to her chick, she first die-bombed me while squawking loudly. Not being able to convince me of how frightening she was, she tried a second strategy: she started flapping one wing and limping away in the opposite direction. It took me a second to understand that she was trying to get me to chase her away from where her baby was hiding. A great example of how mothers everywhere are willing too sacrifice themselves to protect their children. Onassignment for NatGeo natgeopristineseas. and Sea_Legacy with PaulNicklen, Ladzinski, Andy_Mann and CraigWelch. Check out CristinaMittermeier to see more photos of Antarctica including a leopard seal dancing around an iceberg. PhotographersforAntarctica Stopclimatechange ocean conservation respectnature love beauty

1 Days ago
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Photo by michaelchristopherbrown. Kahambo Kilonge Denise narrowly escaped an ambush by the ADF rebel group near the village of Eringeti, located north of Beni in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Denise was relocated to a village nearby, where she stands here outside her hut. One of over 69 rebel groups in North Kivu, the ADF, or Allied Democratic Forces, was formed in Western Uganda and was initially thought by some to be a solely Islamic militia. It is now likely composed of several different groups, including local populations, who terrorize in the North Kivu and Ituri territories mostly to the north of Beni. Mass executions and beheadings have become more common, including among women and children. While working in this region we were forced to stay near the main road though attacks were unpredictable, both in villages and offroad, at all times.

1 Days ago
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Only two days left to own a signed print from one of your favorite natgeo photographers. Visit .com/flashsale (link in profile) to see the collection of photographs available until April 22nd. Here are some of our favorites from coryrichards, cookjenshel, chamiltonjames, pedromcbride, dguttenfelder, and timlaman. earthday natgeocreative

1 Days ago
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Video by joelsartore | A Panther chameleon at the lincolnchildrenszoo. Over time, chameleons’ five toes have evolved into a fused pair of two and three, leaving feet that are perfect for clutching onto the branches they live on. Their eyes move independently from one another, allowing a 360 degree view of the world around them. Chameleons are very territorial, living in isolation with the exception of mating. If two males cross paths, it’s common for them to have a standoff wherein they both change colors and make themselves appear larger by inflating their bodies. Usually, these displays end with one of the two backing down, and changing into a dark, dull color. Chameleons change colors depending on mood, light and temperature. It’s a common misconception that chameleons can change into any color under the sun. Species are born with a certain range of colors and are unable to stray from those. Panther chameleons have been known to exhibit some of the most vibrant variations. To see up close portraits of this panther chameleon, check out joelsartore! . . pantherchameleon reptiles herps chameleon natgeo photoark

1 Days ago
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video by shaulschwarz - Elephants walk and swim in lake Kariba, Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe. Lake Kariba is the world's largest man-made lake and reservoir by volume. African elephants are in trouble. Their numbers have fallen from as many as ten million a hundred years ago to as few as 350,000 today.

1 Days ago